Skipper House

Mid Century Home Renovation on Long Island

The original home, situated in the coastal Long Island community of Roslyn Harbor, had been designed by Jasper Ward at the peak of the mid-century modern movement. Yet, when the homeowners called our team for help, the butterfly-roof home was dilapidated and in desperate need of a thoughtful renovation. The homeowners were able to see beyond the disarray and appreciate many of the home’s iconic, angular features. However, the project required a delicate touch to modernize the existing residence while still preserving its mid century roots.

Our Services

Architecture
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Design Development
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Construction Documents
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Bidding & Value Engineering
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Construction Administration
Interior
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Interior Themes & Layouts
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Interior Material Selection
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Interior Design Development
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Interior Construction Documents
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Interior Furnishing Selections

The family—a team of talented lighting designers—are running a growing business while simultaneously building a family of their own. While they are well-versed in many aspects of architecture and interiors, they needed an architectural team that could help them navigate the complexity of a major home restoration while also merging their unique aesthetic with the existing design. The new home addition creates significantly more space for their growing family without undermining the home's original mid century style.

Original Home


In the 1940’s and 50’s, Long Island began to embrace the style of modernism popularized by architects like George Nelson, Richard Neutra, and Joseph Eichler. Roslyn Harbor and the neighboring coastal villages of Sea Cliff, Flower Hill, Glenwood Landing, and Port Washington became perfect locations for architects who emphasized the value of designs that bring the outdoors in.


Due to the sloping grade of the property, the home is well-suited for a split-level design. This concept allows the home to have a modest presence at entry yet provides each of the family suites with high ceilings and ample light. Additionally, the iconic butterfly roof design helps define the separation between public and private space without creating a large volume of unused area, like traditional gabled-roof designs often do.